David E Irwin

Professor Emeritus

Research Interests

Much of my past research has concentrated on a classic problem in perception: How do we perceive the visual world as unified, stable, and continuous despite the frequent disruptions caused by movements of the eyes? I have addressed this question by examining what people remember from a single glance at a scene, and by examining how people combine information across eye movements. More recently I have been investigating the effects of eye movements on cognitive processing; it turns out that eye movements actually interfere with some cognitive processes but not with others. I am also interested in interactions between perception and language, and in particular the question of how people talk about what they see.

Research Description

Much of my past research has concentrated on a classic problem in perception: How do we perceive the visual world as unified, stable, and continuous despite the frequent disruptions caused by movements of the eyes? I have addressed this question by examining what people remember from a single glance at a scene, and by examining how people combine information across eye movements. More recently I have been investigating the effects of eye movements on cognitive processing; it turns out that eye movements actually interfere with some cognitive processes but not with others. I am also interested in interactions between perception and language, and in particular the question of how people talk about what they see.

Education

Ph.D. from the University of Michigan

Additional Campus Affiliations

Institute Affiliate, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Recent Publications

Robinson, M. M., & Irwin, D. E. (2019). Are there two visual short-term memory stores? A state-trace analysis. Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 90, 23-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmp.2019.02.001

Cronin, D. A., & Irwin, D. E. (Accepted/In press). Visual Working Memory Supports Perceptual Stability Across Saccadic Eye Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. https://doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000567

Irwin, D. E., & Robinson, M. M. (2018). How post-saccadic target blanking affects the detection of stimulus displacements across saccades. Vision Research, 142, 11-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2017.09.004

Robinson, M. M., Clevenger, J., & Irwin, D. E. (2018). The action is in the task set, not in the action. Cognitive Psychology, 100, 17-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogpsych.2017.11.005

Robinson, M. M., & Irwin, D. E. (2017). Conscious error perception: The impact of response interference from a secondary task. Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, 79(3), 863-877. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-016-1276-3

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