Karen D Rudolph

Professor

Research Interests

developmental psychopathology; depression; stress and emotion; adolescent development; family and peer relationships

Research Description

The overall goal of Dr. Rudolph’s research is to identify risk and protective processes that amplify or attenuate vulnerability to psychopathology across development, with a focus on adolescence as a stage of particular sensitivity. Her research uses a multi-level, multi-method approach that considers how personal attributes of youth (e.g., gender, temperament, emotion regulation, social motivation, coping, neuroendocrine profiles, neural processing), development (e.g., pubertal timing, social transitions), and contexts (e.g., early adversity, stressors, family and peer relationships) intersect to contribute to the development of psychopathology, particularly depression and suicide. This research aims to understand both the origins and consequences of individual differences in risk. A variety of methodological approaches are used, including longitudinal survey-based research, interviews, behavior observations, experimental tasks, hormone assessments, and fMRI. Recent work also involves the development of a prevention program for adolescent depression.

Education

Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles

Additional Campus Affiliations

Professor, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Recent Publications

Owens, S. A., Helms, S. W., Rudolph, K. D., Hastings, P. D., Nock, M. K., & Prinstein, M. J. (2019). Interpersonal Stress Severity Longitudinally Predicts Adolescent Girls’ Depressive Symptoms: the Moderating Role of Subjective and HPA Axis Stress Responses. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 47(5), 895-905. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0483-x

Davis, M. M., Miernicki, M. E., Telzer, E. H., & Rudolph, K. D. (2019). The Contribution of Childhood Negative Emotionality and Cognitive Control to Anxiety-Linked Neural Dysregulation of Emotion in Adolescence. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 47(3), 515-527. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0456-0

Massing-Schaffer, M., Helms, S. W., Rudolph, K. D., Slavich, G. M., Hastings, P. D., Giletta, M., ... Prinstein, M. J. (2019). Preliminary Associations among Relational Victimization, Targeted Rejection, and Suicidality in Adolescents: A Prospective Study. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 48(2), 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2018.1469093

Rudolph, K. D., Monti, J. D., Modi, H., Sze, W. Y., & Troop-Gordon, W. (Accepted/In press). Protecting Youth Against the Adverse Effects of Peer Victimization: Why Do Parents Matter? Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-019-00576-9

Eisenlohr-Moul, T. A., Miller, A. B., Giletta, M., Hastings, P. D., Rudolph, K. D., Nock, M. K., & Prinstein, M. J. (2018). HPA axis response and psychosocial stress as interactive predictors of suicidal ideation and behavior in adolescent females: a multilevel diathesis-stress framework. Neuropsychopharmacology, 43(13), 2564-2571. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-018-0206-6

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